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Code of Worker Co-op Governance, CooperativesUK

The attached pdf, by CooperativesUK, is a booklet which seeks to practically implement the ICA World Declaration on Worker Ownership.  The link is a longer version of the same containing other resources as well.  “The booklet is intentionally short. It focuses on the core features of a well-governed worker co-operative rather than providing details about the policies and procedures required. Instead, these details are available on the online version of the Worker Co-operative Code of Governance, which we have developed to complement to this booklet. Here you’ll find an interactive version of the Code, with links through to examples of policies, procedures and strategies that successful worker co-operatives use, as well as containing other useful hints, tips and ideas.” The-worker-co-operative-code-of-governance

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Pricing for Profit

A presentation on pricing for profit from the CWCF’s AGM 2006. Excerpt: Objective: To gain an understanding of the basics of pricing in order to determine at what level of sales at a particular price, will enough revenue be produced to generate the wages and profits which the co-op requires. Why is Pricing Important: Price is often a key determinant of market acceptance of the product or service. Pricing is a key factor in determining the amount of revenue a co-op will generate. Since revenue is required to pay expenses and to produce profit, pricing is crucial. Pricing for Profit

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Worker Co-ops and Employment Law in Canada

Prepared for: Canadian Worker Co-operative Federation and Saint Mary’s University By John McNamara, Student, Master of Management Co-operatives and Credit Unions, St. Mary’s University Excerpt: 1.0 Introduction Worker co-operatives occupy a unique place in the economy and employment law. The employees of the organization also control the organization as owners. As a result, the workers set the rules, which they must follow. Organizationally, the government sees these co-operatives as employers and treats them as any other employer. It may be a sentiment of members in a worker co-operative that they should be able to do what they want since they are both employer and employee, but the state has different considerations. Worker co-operatives must act within the law. Among other things, this means determining if there is an employer-employee relationship. If there is such a relationship, then the co-operative must also abide by employment standards. Even if there is not,…

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Worker Co-op Toolbox

Worker Coop Toolbox The above guide Supports Worker Co-op Formation and Expansion Developed by the North country Cooperative Foundation (Minnesota), the Worker Co-op Toolbox provides a new set of resources to assist potential worker co-op members and their partners in choosing, planning, organizing, and supporting new and existing employee-owned cooperatives. Thanks to Northcountry Cooperative Development Fund for granting permission to republish. Excerpt: In today’s dynamic marketplace, employee-owned cooperatives can provide a wide variety of workers with business-ownership opportunities offering a range of benefits that are hard to find in any other corporate structure: democratic governance, enhanced job security, and profit sharing based on labor input. Employee-owned businesses can also provide unique economic benefits to local communities by generating locally based economic activity and anchoring capital in a community. Because worker co-ops are owned by employees rather than investors, they create a situation where engaged, local ownership can flourish, rather than absentee…

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Union-Led Buy-Outs

Guides drafted in spring 2009 for union-led conversions to worker co-ops from other business forms, by the Western Labour-Worker Coop Council. 1of4 Union-Led Buy-Outs – Coop Basics2of4 Union-Led Buy-Outs – Checklist3of4 Union-Led Buy-Outs – Steps4of4 Union-Led Buy-Outs – Success

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Steps in a Worker Buyout of a Company

(1) Educate the supporters of the buyout. Supporters may include all of the hourly and salaried employees as well as local management. Frequently, in situations involving an organized workforce, those employees protected by a union contract are the initial proponents. (2) Establish a buyout association. Membership in the buyout association is usually open to all the potential future employee-owners. A leadership team is usually selected to put the buyout together on behalf of the buyout association. Through its leadership, the buyout association: a) Raises funds from members and solicits matching funds from government and other potential contributors; b) Contracts with and oversees the work of legal and financial consultants, and c) Develops a management team. (3) Do a pre-feasibility assessment. This assessment is a quick study by the development consultants of the key factors needed for the buyout to succeed. (4) Conduct a feasibility study. A professionally done feasibility study…

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